Abingdon’s Historic Charm

Check-in to the Martha Washington Inn & Spa.
Address
335 Cummings Street
Abingdon, VA 24210
Region Blue Ridge Highlands
Locality Washington
Phone: (276) 676-2282
Phone: (800) 435-3440
Fax: (276) 676-3076
Website visitabingdonvirginia.com

Day One
Plan to arrive in historic Abingdon by late afternoon to check-in to the Martha Washington Inn & Spa. Built in 1862 as a private home, The Martha has served as a finishing school, a Civil War hospital and a women's college. For dinner, head downstairs to Sister's at The Martha for upscale casual dining experience. Then sit on front porch for a relaxing evening of conversation or walk the extension to the Virginia Creeper Trail for a short walk and scenic Southwest Virginia views from the trestles.

Day Two
After breakfast, stroll down our Virginia Main Street to the Fields-Penn House Museum. This historic home, built in 1858, has been preserved as a museum and showcases the life of a prosperous, pre-war family. Then continue down the brick sidewalks towards the Arts Depot - a historic railroad depot that houses working artisan studios. Afterwards, grab a bite to eat at Baby cakes Unique Eats, where you will find a menu of inventive soups and sandwiches and of course gourmet cupcakes! Then catch a trolley (Saturdays only) to the William King Museum. Housed in a former 1913 school, this museum is the only nationally accredited museum west of Roanoke, Virginia. Jump back on the trolley to visit the Abingdon Muster Grounds - the start of the Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail. This trail follows the path of brave volunteers who mustered in Abingdon to begin their journey to Kings Mountain, SC, where they defeated the British army in one of the Revolution's decisive battles.

Head back to The Martha to freshen up before you walk to The Tavern for dinner. Located in the oldest building in town, this upscale dining experience comes complete with hand-crafted cocktails and moss on the roof. Then take in a show at the historic Barter Theatre. Originally built as a church in 1829, Robert Porterfield opened it up as a theatre during the Great Depression for patrons to "barter" for tickets with produce and food goods. Now with a resident company of professional actors, the theatre delights 160,000 patrons a year between their two stages.

Day Three
Before leaving town, take a self-guided walking tour of downtown's historic buildings. Before heading home, have a bite to eat a BoneFire Smokehouse. Located in an old hardware store, their menu boasts smoked on-site meats, a BBQ sauce bar and more sides than you can count.




Last Updated: 7/11/2014 3:43 PM