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Shenandoah National Park

Skyline Drive

Shenandoah National Park

Timber Hollow Overlook

Shenandoah National Park

Mary's Rock Tunnel

Shenandoah National Park

Hawksbill Overlook

Shenandoah National Park

Guided Hikes

When mentioning Shenandoah National Park, visitors often get that faraway look in their eye, fondly recalling adventures at this scenic mountain jewel rising high atop Virginia’s Appalachians. What makes Shenandoah so special? First, consider panoramic views from overlooks scattered on lofty Skyline Drive, which runs 105 miles down the length of the 300-square-mile sanctuary. Additionally, beyond Skyline Drive lies another Shenandoah, where bears roam the hollows and brook trout ply the tumbling streams. Trail side flowers color the woods. Quartz, granite, and greenstone outcrops jut above the diverse forest, allowing far-flung views of the Blue Ridge and surrounding Shenandoah Valley. It is this beauty near and far that create the unforgettable Shenandoah experience.

Shenandoah -- Virginia’s first national park -- was dedicated July 3, 1936. Cobbled together along the Blue Ridge from Front Royal to Waynesboro, the long narrow preserve divides the proud Shenandoah Valley from the rolling Piedmont to the east. The park contains a wide array of flora and fauna as it rises from a mere 550 feet at its lowest elevation to over 4,049 feet at its highest atop Hawksbill.

–WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO –

  • Shenandoah National Park has an entrance fee, payable at one of the four major entrance stations. The fee is good for 7 consecutive days, even if you leave the park.
  • The weather tends to be up to 10 degrees cooler than the surrounding lowlands, a good thing in summer.
  • Although supplies are limited in the park, fuel is available 24/7 at Big Meadows Wayside.
  • Skyline Drive closes during bad weather. If you have weather concerns, call (540) 999-3500, 1, 1 to see if Skyline Drive is open.
  • The Park has three districts, each with its own characteristics - North, Central and South. Explore each district. Try new places and discover new wonders of Virginia’s biggest and oldest national park.
  • Stop by any Virginia Welcome Center to pick up a park guide with a convenient pull out map of Shenandoah National Park.
 

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